Translatome profiling of plum pox virus infected leaves in European plum reveals temporal and spatial coordination of defense responses in phloem tissues.

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TitleTranslatome profiling of plum pox virus infected leaves in European plum reveals temporal and spatial coordination of defense responses in phloem tissues.
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2019
AuthorsCollum, TD, Stone, AL, Sherman, DJ, Rogers, EE, Dardick, C, Culver, JN
JournalMol Plant Microbe Interact
Date Published2019 Jul 26
ISSN0894-0282
Abstract

Plum pox virus (PPV) is the causative agent of sharka, a devastating disease of stone fruits including peaches, apricots, and plums. PPV infection levels and associated disease symptoms can vary greatly depending upon the virus strain, host species or cultivar as well as developmental age of the infected tissues. For example, peaches often exhibit mild symptoms in leaves and fruit while European plums typically display severe chlorotic rings. Systemic virus spread into all host tissues occurs via the phloem, a process that is poorly understood in perennial plant species which undergo a period of dormancy and must annually renew phloem tissues. Currently, little is known about how phloem tissues respond to virus infection. Here, we used translating ribosome affinity purification (TRAP) followed by RNA sequencing to identify phloem and non-phloem specific gene responses to PPV infection during leaf development in European plum (Prunus domestica L.). Results showed that during secondary leaf morphogenesis (four- and six-week-old leaves) the phloem had a disproportionate response to PPV infection with two- to six-fold more differentially expressed genes (DEGs) in phloem than non-phloem tissues despite similar levels of viral transcripts. In contrast, in mature twelve-week-old leaves virus transcript levels dropped significantly in phloem tissues but not in non-phloem tissues. This drop in virus transcripts correlated with an 18-fold drop in phloem specific DEGs. Furthermore, genes associated with defense responses including RNA silencing were spatially coordinated in response to PPV accumulation and were specifically induced in phloem tissues at four to six weeks. Combined these findings highlight the temporal and spatial dynamics of leaf tissue responses to virus infection and reveal the importance of phloem responses within a perennial host.

DOI10.1094/MPMI-06-19-0152-FI
Alternate JournalMol. Plant Microbe Interact.
PubMed ID31347973