Combining vascular targeting and the local first pass provides 100-fold higher uptake of ICAM-1-targeted vs untargeted nanocarriers in the inflamed brain.

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TitleCombining vascular targeting and the local first pass provides 100-fold higher uptake of ICAM-1-targeted vs untargeted nanocarriers in the inflamed brain.
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2019
AuthorsMarcos-Contreras, OA, Brenner, JS, Kiseleva, RY, Zuluaga-Ramirez, V, Greineder, CF, Villa, CH, Hood, ED, Myerson, JW, Muro, S, Persidsky, Y, Muzykantov, VR
JournalJ Control Release
Volume301
Pagination54-61
Date Published2019 Mar 11
ISSN1873-4995
Abstract

New advances in intra-arterial (IA) catheters offer clinically proven local interventions in the brain. Here we tested the effect of combining local IA delivery and vascular immunotargeting. Microinjection of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF╬▒) in the brain parenchyma causes cerebral overexpression of Inter-Cellular Adhesion Molecule-1 (ICAM-1) in mice. Systemic intravenous injection of ICAM-1 antibody (anti-ICAM-1) and anti-ICAM-1/liposomes provided nearly an order of magnitude higher uptake in the inflamed vs normal brain (from ~0.1 to 0.8%ID/g for liposomes). Local injection of anti-ICAM-1 and anti-ICAM-1/liposomes via carotid artery catheter provided an additional respective 2-fold and 5-fold elevation of uptake in the inflamed brain vs levels attained by IV injection. The uptake in the inflamed brain of respective untargeted IgG counterparts was markedly lower (e.g., uptake of anti-ICAM-1/liposomes was 100-fold higher vs IgG/liposomes). These data affirm the specificity of the combined effect of the first pass and immunotargeting. Intravital real-time microscopy via cranial window revealed that anti-ICAM-1/liposomes, but not IgG/liposomes bind to the lumen of blood vessels in the inflamed brain within minutes after injection. This straightforward framework provides the basis for translational efforts towards local vascular drug targeting to the brain.

DOI10.1016/j.jconrel.2019.03.008
Alternate JournalJ Control Release
PubMed ID30871995