Microfluidic electrochemical sensor array for characterizing protein interactions with various functionalized surfaces.

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TitleMicrofluidic electrochemical sensor array for characterizing protein interactions with various functionalized surfaces.
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2011
AuthorsDykstra, PH, Roy, V, Byrd, C, Bentley, WE, Ghodssi, R
JournalAnal Chem
Volume83
Issue15
Pagination5920-7
Date Published2011 Aug 1
ISSN1520-6882
KeywordsAnimals, Biosensing Techniques, Cattle, Cyclic AMP Receptor Protein, Electrochemical Techniques, Electrodes, Lymphotoxin-alpha, Microfluidic Analytical Techniques, Polyethylene Glycols, Protein Interaction Mapping, Serum Albumin, Bovine, Surface Properties, Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha
Abstract

We present a unique microfluidic platform to allow for quick and sensitive probing of protein adsorption to various functionalized surfaces. The ability to tailor a sensor surface for a specific analyte is crucial for the successful application of portable gas and fluid sensors and is of great interest to the drug screening community. However, choosing the correct surface chemistry to successfully passivate against nonspecific binding typically requires repeated trial and error experiments. The presented device incorporates an array of integrated electrochemical sensors for fast, sensitive, label-free detection of these binding interactions. The layout of the electrodes allows for loading various surface chemistries in one direction while sensing their interactions with particular compounds in another without any cross-contamination. Impedance data is collected for three commonly used passivation compounds (mercaptohexanol, polyethylene glycol, and bovine serum albumin) and demonstrates their interaction with three commonly studied proteins in genetic and cancer research (cAMP receptor protein, tumor necrosis factor α, and tumor necrosis factor β). The ability to quickly characterize various surface interactions provides knowledge for selecting optimal functionalization for any biosensor.

DOI10.1021/ac200835s
Alternate JournalAnal. Chem.
PubMed ID21688780